Disasters

Displaying 1 - 7 of 7
  • 16 Dec 2013- 09:56 by Local Press Report MANAGUA The Daily Caller The Sandinista government of Nicaragua is rapidly moving forward with a plan to allow a Beijing-based Chinese businessman to build a huge canal connecting Nicaragua’s Pacific and Atlantic coasts. The plan gives telecommunications CEO
  • 11 Dec 2013- 10:06 by OOSKAnews Correspondent VIENTIANE, Laos The World Bank’s International Finance Corporation (IFC) and the Lao National Chamber of Commerce signed an agreement last week to launch a Hydropower Developers Working Group. The group aims to ensure that hydropower projects are
  • 12 Nov 2013- 10:05 by OOSKAnews Correspondent VIENTIANE, Laos In an effort to ease regional concerns about the environmental and social impacts of its dam-building on the Mekong River, Laotian government officials this week organized a visit to the site of the planned Don Sahong hydropower project.
  • 18 Oct 2013- 10:26 by OOSKAnews Correspondent MANAGUA, Nicaragua Environmentalists and residents of the Nicaraguan city of Matagalpa are protesting Canadian mining company B2Gold's latest planned open pit gold mine in the country. Nicaraguan environmental NGO The Humboldt Center said the
  • 16 Oct 2013- 10:01 by OOSKAnews Correspondent VIENTIANE, Laos Laos’ plan to construct the $720 million USD, 260-megawatt Don Sahong Dam does not violate the Mekong agreement because the project is not being built on the main stem of the Mekong River, according to Laotian Deputy Minister of Energy
  • 3 Sep 2013- 10:01 by OOSKAnews Correspondent MANAGUA, Nicaragua Nicaragua is looking to attract Indian businesses to participate in its planned canal project to link the Caribbean Sea and Atlantic Ocean with the Pacific Ocean. A Chinese company, HK Nicaragua Canal Development Investment Co. Ltd
  • 29 Aug 2013- 09:59 by OOSKAnews Correspondent BEIJING, China Chinese activities in the Mekong River basin, particularly mineral resource and hydropower projects, have had a negative impact on the region’s environment, according to a new “blue book” published by the Social Sciences Academic Press