Disasters

Displaying 1 - 15 of 27
  • Malawi and Tanzania have agreed that the mediation process in their border dispute over Lake Malawi should be concluded by early next year.
  • The Malawi government has awarded a new offshore petroleum license to South African firm SacOil Holdings Ltd. that will allow the company to explore for oil in Lake Malawi, Mines Minister John Bande confirmed this week.
  • High-ranking government officials from Malawi and Tanzania have agreed to travel to Mozambique next week, where they will ask former Mozambican President Joachim Chisano to mediate in the two countries’ ongoing border dispute over Lake Malawi, also known as Lake Nyasa.
  • Malawi’s Foreign Affairs Minister Ephraim Mganda Chiume on December 5 claimed that Tanzania is delaying the planned Southern Africa Development Community (SADC) mediation in the countries’ border dispute over Lake Malawi, also known as Lake Nyasa.
  • Malawian President Joyce Banda reiterated this week that Malawi would not agree to share ownership of any part of Lake Malawi with any “other country,” referring to neighboring Tanzania.
  • Talks between Malawi and Tanzania to resolve their border dispute over Lake Malawi ended in a deadlock last week. On November 17, Malawian Information Minister Moses Kunkuyu announced that the two countries had agreed to “file a request for mediation by former Heads of State from the Southern African Development Corporation (SADC) Region, to be assisted by a panel of eminent jurists.”
  • As the Malawi government prepares to enter a new round of talks with Tanzania this week over ownership of Lake Malawi, the country's president Joyce Banda has asked the country’s opposition political parties to rally behind her administration.
  • Malawi has turned down Tanzania’s most recent request to revive stalled talks to resolve the ongoing border dispute over Lake Malawi, known in Tanzania as Lake Nyasa. According to a high-ranking Malawi government official, the Tanzanian government had sent a letter asking a Malawian delegation to come to Tanzania for talks.
  • Malawi will not relinquish any part of Lake Malawi to any other country, Principal Secretary at the Foreign Affairs Ministry Patrick Kabambe said on November 1.
  • The Public Affairs Committee (PAC)-- an umbrella organization of influential religious groups that played a role in Malawi’s political transition from a one-party to a multi-party political system in the early 1990s-- has accused the current government of being “soft” on Tanzania over ownership of Lake Malawi.
  • The United Nations is advising Malawi and Tanzania to refer their dispute over Lake Malawi to African regional bodies before seeking other international arbitration.
  • Malawi’s President Joyce Banda said this week that her government would not hold further talks with Tanzania over ownership of Lake Malawi until Tanzania addresses its recent actions on the disputed water body.
  • Malawi’s government will do everything in its power to defend its territory, Defense Minister Ken Kandodo said. In remarks carried by the Malawi News Agency, Kandodo also reiterated that Malawians living along Lake Malawi in the border district of Karonga need not fear for their safety in the ongoing dispute between Malawi and Tanzania over ownership of the lake, saying the government is ready to protect them.
  • Despite recent moves to explore for oil in Lake Malawi, over which Malawi and Tanzania are currently locked in a territorial dispute, actual oil drilling will likely not start until 2032, according to Malawian officials. Several Environmental Impact Assessments (EIAs) must be completed first, according to a high-ranking Malawi government official in the Environmental Department.
  • Malawian President Joyce Banda has asked the African Union (AU) to intervene in the country’s dispute with Tanzania over ownership of Lake Malawi. Malawi Broadcasting Corporation reported this week that Banda asked for AU intervention during talks with Benin President Yayi Boni, the AU’s current chairman.

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